A discórdia dos Electronics Sounds
(Nicholas Schaffner*)



um lado deste disco deixou Bernie Krause indignado!


     One unorthodox venture was Apple's first and only subsidiary label: Zapple Records. According to the Beatles, this was a “paperback records concept”. Zapple releases, to include the spoken word ramblings of such literati as Richard Brautigan, Ken Kesey, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, and Michael McClure, would be budget-priced speciaty items that people were supposed to listen to once or twice and throw away. Typically, however, the Beatles' interest in the project proved to be but momentary. The only two Zapple records that did materialize were John and Yoko’s sequel to their less-than-universally—cherished Two Virgins affair, and an album’s worth of Moog synthesizer doodlings released under George Harrison’s byline. Both may indeed have been disposable, but the other part of the by time the LPs reached the shops: each sported a harbhack-sized American list price of six dollars. (...)
     But for most ordinary folk, both John and Yoko’s "
Unfinished Music and George’s Electronic Sound were virtually unlistenable. Harrison seemed to score a further black mark when it was revealed tha some of the synthesized burps and farts on his LP might not even have been his in the first place.
     According to Bernard L. Krause (of
Beaver ands Krause fame), who had met Harrison when both were working on Jackie Lomax’s Apple albun, he and George had hung around in the sudios one night after the sessions in order for Krause to give the Beatle a Moog synthesizer demonstration. Krause claims that his performance was taped by Harrison, and subsequently used to fill out a whole side of Electronic Sound. In a letter to Rolling Stone, Krause stated that on the LP cover “under” ‘produced by Geo. Harrison’ you will find my name silvered over. I am frankly hurt and a bit disillusioned by the whole thing”.
At least the artwork on the jacket was George’s.

     *Transcrito do livro, "The Beatles Forever" pg 118-19. Editado por McGraw-Hill Paperbacks, cujo autor é o próprio, Nicholas Schaffner.